• IDG Contributor Network: Big week for open source news: Round up of OSCON announcements

     

    OSCON is always seen as a good event to announce new products and initiatives of an open source nature. OSCON was, after all, the place where Rackspace and NASA chose to announce the OpenStack cloud initiative several years ago. This year’s event had nothing of quite that importance, but still some brought about some interesting announcements.

    HDS

    First up comes Hitachi Data Systems. HDS is a wholly owned subsidiary of Hitachi and in recent years has done a great job of connecting some of the very diverse business units that the Hitachi mothership holds. HDS is today announcing that its Unified Compute Platform (UCP) is going to support Google Kubernentes, the containers orchestration initiative. UCP is a broad infrastructure offering, first introduced in 2010, and already supports software from VMware, SAP, and Microsoft.

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Druva aims to deliver complete data protection and compliance for the enterprise

     

    With a product announcement this week, data protection company Druva aims to give enterprises assistance with managing the sometimes-conflicting aims of leveraging new technology for greater efficiency, while still remaining safe and secure in terms of data protection. So what has Druva got in the pipeline now?

    Utilized by more than 3,000 organizations around the world and protecting data on a reported 3 million devices, Druva is all about data protection for the mobile workforce. What that means is that Druva takes care of backup and availability of data, alongside broad governance. Druva’s product aims to ensure that specific data remains within the confines of your organization, while other data can be shared externally. Druva then sits in two camps – both the data backup and recovery space and the endpoint security space. These two worlds are increasingly coming together, and Druva is an example of this trend.

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Appcito extends its application-aware infrastructure management platform

     

    As organizations increasingly think about infrastructure not in isolation but rather as the plumbing upon which applications sit, there is a corresponding move to think about how to make infrastructure that is “application aware.” Appcito is one vendor offering a platform that promises to fulfill this very promise.

    Appcito markets a product called CAFE. CAFE stands for Cloud Application Front-End and it is a subscription-based infrastructure management platform. The idea of CAFE is that enables infrastructure that helps customers move to a continuous-delivery way of working. Appcito is focused on the management aspects of infrastructure and covers the key areas that are needed to deliver robust infrastructure. According to Appcito, the key arms of the CAFE product are:

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  • IDG Contributor Network: More Autonomy fallout: HP parts ways with iManage

     

    iManage provides a work management solution that is targeted at legal, accounting, and financial services firms. iManage has some 3,000 customers around the world, including over 1,800 law firms. iManage itself was first acquired by content management vendor Interwoven in 2003, which was subsequently acquired by Autonomy in 2009. So when HP acquired Autonomy in August 2011, iManage was part of the deal. The Autonomy acquisition was seen as an absolute fiasco and saw HP claim that Autonomy’s executives committed fraud and significant accounting “irregularities.” The upshot was that HP paid far too much for the company and later took a write down of close to $10 billion related to Autonomy.

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Linux Foundation gathers heavy hitters for containerization orchestration body

     

    We all know that cloud-native applications are different from legacy ones. Cloud apps have a tendency to use discrete application building blocks, to use distributed hardware, to have different scaling attributes, and to be iterative in nature. Of c…

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Apprenda picks up $24 million to fuel private PaaS

     

    Apprenda is a different sort of technology company. For a start, it’s based in New York and hence has a more corporate feel than its Silicon Valley counterparts. Whereas hoodies and flip-flops are de rigeur in the valley, Apprenda CEO Sinclair Schul…

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Puppet Labs’ 2015 State of DevOps report: What role does IT leadership play?

     

    DevOps is a funny term that will sound very much like inside baseball for those outside of the technology industry. It is, however, a complex-sounding term for a simple movement. The idea of DevOps (itself a conjunction of the term developer operations) is that those who build applications should have an active role in, and an understanding of, the operational management of those apps. Looking at it from the other perspective, those who are responsible for the operation of applications should have a firm grasp on development approaches.

    In traditional IT shops, developers and operations teams are distinct. Developers’ sole function is to “cut code.” They create the applications and then throw them over the wall to operations, whose task it is to make those applications actually run on the infrastructure at their disposal. This separate approach ends up being somewhat adversarial, with developers thinking of operations teams as smelly geeks down in the basement who don’t have a clue about what application users really want. Operations, for its part, thinks of developers as living on another planet with no real idea of what it takes to run a secure and high-performing IT shop. 

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Huddle chases Box, introduces deeper integration with Microsoft Office

     

    It is fascinating watching the various enterprise file-sharing and synchronization (EFSS) vendors dance a complex dance with vendors like Microsoft. While clearly competing with Microsoft’s own EFSS solutions, OneDrive, and SharePpint, these solutions also want to support customers who are deeply wedded to Microsoft’s office productivity suite, Office. 

    We can see this not-so-subtle dance in action with EFSS vendor Box. The company, which once famously had t-shirts printed with the SharePoint logo changed to “SharePoo,” has in recent years gotten far friendlier with Microsoft, with deep integration between its own solution and Microsoft’s suite. While competition and criticism might make great press, the reality is that the EFSS vendors’ own customers likely use Office and don’t look favorably at walled gardens. 

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  • IDG Contributor Network: DataSift unveils machine learning for developers and marketers

     

    Big data, analytics and predictive insights are very much the flavor du jour in technology marketing land. Vendors and their PR flacks are quick to jump on these buzz words that have seen much interest from customers. DataSift, a vendor that delivers a machine learning platform, is trying to deliver these buzzwords as a platform that is applicable to all and usable by any developer. Or is it?

    There is an interesting trend occurring in the general machine learning space. On the one hand, the real value of a machine learning tool is that it is broadly applicable to whatever datasets and use cases individual customers have. On the other hand, the difficulty with a very broad platform approach is that it doesn’t really provide bounds within which customers can operate. Organizations get the concept of what machine learning is all about, but without specifically tailored offerings, they often find it hard to know how to apply the technology to their situation.

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  • IDG Contributor Network: Google becomes an OpenStack sponsor. What is happening in this world?

     

    Google is today announcing that it is signing up to be a corporate sponsor of the OpenStack Foundation. The OpenStack Foundation is, as the name implies, the governance body for the open-source OpenStack cloud operating system. OpenStack, founded a handful of years ago by Rackspace and NASA, has seen some pretty massive industry support – HP, IBM, and Cisco are three examples of high-profile backers. Add to this mix a massive amount of investment in OpenStack companies and you have a vibrant community.

    Of course, in recent months some of that vibrancy has abated as significant consolidation has occurred in the OpenStack space – IBM acquired Blue Box, Cisco acquired Piston Cloud and Metacloud, EMC acquired CloudScaling. In the community that once boasted (whether wisely or not is another matter) of its plethora of participants, the number of independents has suddenly dwindled.

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